What horrifies me most is the idea of being useless: well-educated, brilliantly promising, and fading out into an indifferent middle age.
Sylvia Plath (via beautilation)
To the extent that the word ‘desegregation’ remains in our vocabulary, it describes an antique principle, not a current priority. Today, we are more likely to talk of diversity—but diversification and desegregation are not the same undertaking. To speak of diversity, in light of this country’s history of racial recidivism, is to focus on bringing ethnic variety to largely white institutions, rather than dismantling the structures that made them so white to begin with.

Jelani Cobb on the failure of desegregation: http://nyr.kr/Qs3Ktj

(via newyorker)

newyorker:

The Korean artist Jee Young Lee created an elaborate installation in her studio, in Seoul, using everyday materials—plywood, paper cups, straws—and handmade props. The constructed landscapes are her interpretations of personal experiences, dreams, and Korean folk tales. Take a look: http://nyr.kr/QrERhB

Top: “Reaching for the Stars”
Bottom: “I’ll Be Back”
All photographs by Jee Young Lee

asylum-art:

A Huge Collection of Embroidered silk  Spheres by  92-year-old grandmother in Japan.

These intricate and extraordinarily beautiful embroidered silk balls are a form of Japanese folk art called Temari, which means “hand ball” in Japanese. These particular temari are even more impressive because they were handmade by a 92-year-old grandmother in Japan. NanaAkua’s flickr

 

abandonedography:

Two Windows, One Chair

instagram:

Sydney’s One Central Park, the World’s Tallest Vertical Garden

To see more photos and videos of the vertical garden, explore the Central Park location page on Instagram.

At Central Park in Sydney, Australia, a 33-floor residential building known as One Central Park houses the world’s tallest vertical garden. Designed by Parisian architect Jean Nouvel, the garden towers at 115 meters (380 feet) and showcases panels of greenery designed by French botanist Patrick Blanc. The panels, some of which are several stories tall, are scattered around the building’s facade and carry 450 types of plants (250 of which are local species).

In addition to the garden, One Central Park is also known for the cantilever that juts out from the top floors of the building. A heliostat of motorized mirrors is installed underneath the cantilever, reflecting sunlight to various areas of the garden. LED art installations designed by French light artist Yann Kersalé are also built into the cantilever, lighting up the environment throughout the night.

When you love something, you don’t threaten it. You don’t punish it. You fight for it. You take care of it. You put it first.
Leslie Knope, Parks and Recreation (via yesdarlingido)

webgeekist:

retr0philia:

calzona-otp:

sharplydressedlesbo:

sizvideos:

To the Boys Who May One Day Date My Daughter - Video

Greatest thing ever

Things like this remind me how much I love poetry slams. 

I fucking love it

this is how you dad.

ami-angelwings:

badass-bharat-deafmuslimpunkstar:

An Indian woman, a Japanese woman, and a Syrian woman, all training to be doctors at Women’s Medical College of Philadelphia, 1880s. (Image courtesy Legacy Center, Drexel University College of Medicine Archives, Philadelphia, PA. Image #p0103) (x)

The Indian woman, Dr. Anandi Gopal Joshi, was the first Indian woman to earn a degree in Western medicine, and also believed to be the first Hindu woman to set foot on American soil.
The Japanese woman, Dr. Kei Okami, was the first Japanese woman to obtain a degree in Western Medicine.
The Syrian woman is Dr. Sabat Islambooly.  Her name is spelled incorrectly on that photograph. 
For those interested, here’s more information on other women of color who attended and graduated from Women’s Medical College of Philadelphia in the past, with a focus on the Japanese-American women they accepted during the US WW2 internment of Japanese-Americans.

ami-angelwings:

badass-bharat-deafmuslimpunkstar:

An Indian woman, a Japanese woman, and a Syrian woman, all training to be doctors at Women’s Medical College of Philadelphia, 1880s. (Image courtesy Legacy Center, Drexel University College of Medicine Archives, Philadelphia, PA. Image #p0103) (x)

The Indian woman, Dr. Anandi Gopal Joshi, was the first Indian woman to earn a degree in Western medicine, and also believed to be the first Hindu woman to set foot on American soil.

The Japanese woman, Dr. Kei Okami, was the first Japanese woman to obtain a degree in Western Medicine.

The Syrian woman is Dr. Sabat Islambooly.  Her name is spelled incorrectly on that photograph. 

For those interested, here’s more information on other women of color who attended and graduated from Women’s Medical College of Philadelphia in the past, with a focus on the Japanese-American women they accepted during the US WW2 internment of Japanese-Americans.

ggeology:

Wulfenite // Urumqi, China

bekkathyst:

Ocean Magics Collection

I put together what I think are the perfect things for a landlocked sea witch! All of the things in this collection are very high quality and 100% natural. 

You are a woman. Skin and bones, veins and nerves, hair and sweat. You are not made of metaphors. Not apologies, not excuses.
Sarah Kay, excerpt from “The Type”. (via h-o-r-n-g-r-y)